Transforming the World

through Mathematics

Events

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3 May – Julian Sahasrabudhe: A new lower bound for sphere packing

24.04.2024
After discussing the history of sphere packings in very large dimension, Sahasrabudhe will describe a novel but simple approach to constructing the densest known sphere packings in large dimension. Julian Sahasrabudhe is faculty at the University of Cambridge, where he has been since 2021. In 2023, he was awarded the Salem Prize.
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19 April – Christoph Sorger: Holomorphic symplectic geometry

08.04.2024
Sorger will give a gentle introduction to classification questions in the field, first for the affine, and then for the compact case. No specific knowledge of algebraic geometry will be assumed. Christoph Sorger has been a Professor of Mathematics at the University of Nantes in France since 1999.
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14. März – MATHINSIDE am Pi Day 2024

26.02.2024
In der Vortragsreihe MATHINSIDE geben Wissenschaftler*innen des Exzellenzclusters MATH+ spannende Einblicke in ihre Forschungsarbeit und in die Anwendungsgebiete der Mathematik. Das Vortragsprogramm eignet sich hervorragend als Ausflugsziel für Schulklassen und -kurse ab Klassenstufe 10. Am 14.03.2024 gibt es Vorträge von Christof Schütte, Antonia Chmiela und Konstantin Fackeldey.
Veber_2024-02

9 February – Amandine Véber: A stochastic model for the growth of a filamentous fungus (Kovalevskaya Colloquium)

27.01.2024
The last MATH+ Friday of the winter semester 2023/24 is a Kovalevskaya Colloquium. This talk will present a toy model for the development of a hyphal network, whose main aim is to identify a small number of key parameters describing the growth of the fungus in homogeneous conditions (in particular, in lab conditions) and to understand and quantify the impact of different forms of stress on this gr...
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26 January – Thomas Nikolaus: The K-Theory of Z/n

19.01.2024
Thomas Nikolaus will indicate how modern tools (such as prismatic cohomology, p-adic Hodge theory, higher algebra) make it possible to tackle fundamental computations, such as K-Theory of finite rings, which have remained open since the 1970s. Thomas Nikolaus is professor of mathematics at the University of Münster.