Transforming the World

through Mathematics

Events

Krause_2020-01

22 Jan – Rolf Krause: Scales of knowledge

19.01.2021
Complex coupled systems arise in medicine, science and engineering. Mathematically, these can be nonlinear coupled systems of PDEs or the nonconvex minimization problems found in deep learning. In this talk, we show how multi-scale approaches give a mathematical technique for accurate and efficient simulation of complex systems. Rolf Krause holds a chair of advanced scientific computing in the Fa...
Helfgott_2021-01

15 Jan – Harald Helfgott: Expander graphs in number theory: the prime divisibility graph

12.01.2021
An expander graph may be defined in any of several ways: in terms of boundaries of vertex sets, or in terms of eigenvalues of the graph Laplacian, or by random walks... Expander graphs have become a central object of study in discrete mathematics. Helfgott will discuss a graph that encodes the divisibility properties of integers by primes. Harald Helfgott is a Humboldt Professor at the University...
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MATH+ Friday Talks: save the dates!

06.01.2021
We have three more MATH+ Friday Talks coming up in the current winter semester:  15 January: Harald Helfgott (Göttingen) 22 January: Rolf Krause (Lugano) 05 February: Sylvia Serfaty (Courant Institute, NYU)
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11 Dec – Amie Wilkinson: Symmetry and asymmetry in dynamics

01.12.2020
In classical mechanics, symmetry occurs for a reason: there is a conserved quantity such as angular momentum. This is Noether’s theorem, and it points to a broader theme in dynamics that symmetry is rare and meaningful. Wilkinson will discuss, in the contexts of modern dynamics and geometry, how this theme recurs in beautiful ways. Amie Wilkinson is a professor at the University of Chicago.