HOW DO NEW CONCEPTS EMERGE? –

ON NEW KNOWLEDGE, OLD PATTERNS OF THOUGHT, AND STRUCTURAL CHANGES

Interdisciplinary Symposium on the Occasion of the Centenary of Emmy Noether’s Habilitation
June 3–5, 2019

“My methods are really methods of working and thinking. That’s why they have crept in everywhere anonymously.” (Noether 1931)
Emmy Noether, one of the world’s most influential mathematicians, defined modern algebra with her “methods of working and thinking” and, thus, made significant contributions to the algebraization of mathematics. By developing a structural perspective on mathematics, she introduced new ways of mathematical investigation. Her habilitation thesis, published in 1918, solved central mathematical problems of general relativity. On June 4, 1919, she defended her habilitation, becoming the first woman in Prussia to complete this step of her scientific career.

In celebration of this event, our interdisciplinary symposium asks, “How do new concepts emerge?” It is hosted by the Berlin Mathematics Research Center MATH+, the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, and the Chief Gender Equality Officer of Freie Universität Berlin. The conference seeks to examine Emmy Noether’s relevance today from the perspectives of various academic fields: mathematics, physics, history of science, and philosophy of science. Furthermore, it considers the mechanisms of discrimination which Emmy Noether faced as a Jewish woman throughout her career in German academia and which continued to affect the posthumous reception of her work.

The conference calls for dialogue transcending disciplinary boundaries. In the spirit of Emmy Noether, it focuses on an openness to new ways of thinking and encourages scrutinizing established academic and societal structures in order to bring innovation into the world.

Contributions by
  • Prof. Dr. Andrea Blunck, Universität Hamburg
  • Prof. Dr. Christina von Braun, Selma Stern Zentrum für Jüdische Studien Berlin-Brandenburg
  • Prof. Dr. Leo Corry, Tel Aviv University
  • Prof. Dr. Catherine Goldstein, Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu-Paris Rive Gauche
  • Dr. Mechthild Koreuber, Freie Universität Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. John Maddocks, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
  • Dr. Anina Mischau, Freie Universität Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Hermann Nicolai, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (requested)
  • Prof. Dr. Jürgen Renn, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
  • Prof. Dr. David Rowe, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
  • Prof. Dr. Tilman Sauer, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
  • Prof. Dr. Reinhard Siegmund-Schultze, University of Agder
  • Prof Dr. Mina Teicher, Emmy Noether Mathematics Institute, Bar-Ilan University
  • Prof. Dr. Ulrike Tillman, University of Oxford (requested)
  • Dr. Cordula Tollmien, freelance Historian
  • Prof. Dr. Anita Traninger, Freie Universität Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. Bettina Wahrig, Technische Universität Braunschweig
Academic Committee
  • Dr. Mechthild Koreuber, Freie Universität Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. Jürgen Renn, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science
  • Prof. Dr. David Rowe, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz
  • Prof. Dr. Christoph Schütte, Zuse Institute Berlin
  • Prof. Dr. Bettina Wahrig, Technische Universität Braunschweig


Accompanying Program
June 4th 2019 will see the public premiere of the play “Mathematical Strolls with Emmy Noether”. This piece was developed by portraittheater wien in cooperation with Dr. Mechthild Koreuber and Prof. Dr. David Rowe. Moreover, the exhibition “Women of Mathematics Throughout Europe”, curated and presented by Prof. Dr. Sylvie Paycha, University of Potsdam, will accompany the symposium.

Location
Freie Universität Berlin

Hosts
Berlin Mathematics Research Center MATH+, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Chief Gender Equality Officer of Freie Universität Berlin

Registration and Further Information
Starting March 2019 on www.noetherkonferenz2019.de